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 1 
 on: Today at 09:58:23 AM 
Started by jessikalindst - Last post by jessikalindst
Okay so, when you want to resubmit to an agent, do you go about it as re-querying? Do you send the original requested materials but obviously mention that it has gone through the revisions requested? How does the process go?

Asking ahead of time because I'm preparing to resubmit to the agent I mention next month.


Since you and the agent previously agreed that you would do an R&R, I would respond to the original email (but change the subject line to "TITLE - Revise & Resubmit" or something like that), write a brief note to the agent (thanking them for agreeing to take another look, telling them the revised version is attached, etc.), and attach the revised materials to the email (whether it's a revised partial, revised full, etc.).

If the agent hadn't already agreed to take a second look, then you would treat it as a re-query (i.e new email chain, new query letter, etc.).



Thank you so much TigerAsh!  Grin

 2 
 on: Today at 09:42:51 AM 
Started by A.J.thekid - Last post by neverish
Oooh, yes, that last paragraph is so much better now! Gosh, the people on these forums are so genius. It also refers to the Shadow Thief by his "name," which I prefer for clarity.

 3 
 on: Today at 09:37:22 AM 
Started by jbstclair - Last post by neverish
I agree with everything Rivergirl says here. It's a really good, cleanly-written query to start with, which is awesome! It's just hard to tell what the real drive of the story is.

 4 
 on: Today at 09:00:14 AM 
Started by A.J.thekid - Last post by A.J.thekid
Updated! Do you think I broke the last paragraph up enough?


Following the death of her parents, eleven-year-old Esther is shipped off to the backwoods to live with her grandfather, Ethan. He's rude and appears senile, especially when mumbling to himself or his horse. When Esther overhears Ethan talking to himself about saving the world, she believes he's crazy, until she too hears the fairy-like creature inviting her to join their conversation.

To Esther's wonder, the fairy tells her of an Evil Lord hell-bent on destroying Earth. The good news, he is locked away in a hidden prison. The bad news, a mysterious creature known as the Shadow Thief has stolen the collection of prison keys that open the Evil Lord's prison cell.

Because of the hidden magic that flows within her, Esther is offered the opportunity to be the secret Guardian of Earth. Her first mission would be to hunt down the Shadow Thief and retrieve the stolen keys. Ethan is adamant she refuse, but Esther, allured by talk of magic and adventure, finds it impossible to give up even if she must lose something more valuable than it all—her life.

 5 
 on: Today at 08:30:02 AM 
Started by sjloderuc - Last post by sjloderuc
I agree with Kaperton, 7k is pretty long. I think most chapters are between 1k - 5k? But if you feel the chapter flows well and is intriguing enough, I say keep it!

That said, your first chapter should really draw someone in. Sometimes starting with a lot of exposition isn't the best bet (not that I'm saying that's necessarily what's going on here). We'll get to know the characters by seeing how they act throughout the story, and sometimes back story is more interesting when fed to us in pieces instead of all at once.

Thank you!  Yeah I agree with your thoughts.  You know how it is as a writer.  You like a part, but it takes someone else saying that it doesn't work to really open your eyes.  The first chapter is so important.  I want it to pop!

 6 
 on: Today at 08:28:15 AM 
Started by sjloderuc - Last post by sjloderuc
Yeah, 7K is pretty long. I don't believe I ever had an agent request a first chapter though. Usually they ask for the first X number of pages. They're looking to see if the story grabs them and if your writing is good. I don't think you necessarily need to start your novel with a "bang" but something should entice us to keep reading.

Can you post your giant chapter so we can take a look? Feel free to PM me if you don't want to post it on the site.

I don't mind posting the chapter.  FYI the original stopping point for chapter one was after he was released from class.  I appreciate your insight.  I'm not at all against getting rid of the school part of the story, and adding to the tree house section. 

Let me know your thoughts and feel free to comment on the doc as well if you'd like.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XsuX0tI7xl0p0--dQtzobCD5qaM09o8kHUXH_dP2Y2Q/edit?usp=sharing


 7 
 on: Today at 06:36:33 AM 
Started by jbstclair - Last post by rivergirl
Adopted from a South Korean orphanage by American parents, Jacob Caldwell has long held an interest in his birth country. He’s tried all the foods, taken a crack at learning the language, and even dated a couple of Korean women. Still, when presented with the opportunity to return and search for his biological parents, he’s always declined. He knows finding them is a long shot. Even worse—what if they don’t want to meet him? I don't know what you mean by ''he's always declined" Declined by who?This warrants explanation since it's the one thing preventing him from going. Other than that strong first para.

But when Jacob graduates from college in the depths of the Great Recession, he accepts a job in Korea as a middle school English teacher. Soon he finds an international circle of friends who help him adjust to his new home. They teach him some of the finer points of Korean life: which songs to perform at a noraebang, when to refill the principal’s soju glass at a school dinner, and how to silence a roomful of unruly ninth graders. More than that, they give him the support he needs to seek out his birth family. While this is a clean second para. It's missing conflict. I think it would be worth noting in this parag. that his stay is limited to a single year. It puts a bit more urgency to the story. It sounds like the point of the story is to locate the birth parents. This needs to be spelled out a bit more clearly. As written, looking for his birth parents sounds like a happy by product of being in Korea
 
Jacob’s search produces few leads at first. Worse yet, his comfortable group of friends breaks apart under the stress of life overseas. Alone, Jacob must confront the possibility that his birth family may be lost to him forever. But as the end of his year in Korea approaches, he receives a life-changing piece of news—one that will force him to choose which side of the ocean his future lies.  Strong end.

 8 
 on: Today at 02:30:42 AM 
Started by MsGretaGreen - Last post by MsGretaGreen
Thank you, Kaperton for taking a look at my pages!

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 10:39:04 PM 
Started by jbstclair - Last post by jbstclair
Dear all,

I would love to hear any feedback you might have for my query letter. 

Dear Agent:
 
Adopted from a South Korean orphanage by American parents, Jacob Caldwell has long held an interest in his birth country. He’s tried all the foods, taken a crack at learning the language, and even dated a couple of Korean women. Still, when presented with the opportunity to return and search for his biological parents, he’s always declined. He knows finding them is a long shot. Even worse—what if they don’t want to meet him?

But when Jacob graduates from college in the depths of the Great Recession, he accepts a job in Korea as a middle school English teacher. Soon he finds an international circle of friends who help him adjust to his new home. They teach him some of the finer points of Korean life: which songs to perform at a noraebang, when to refill the principal’s soju glass at a school dinner, and how to silence a roomful of unruly ninth graders. More than that, they give him the support he needs to seek out his birth family.
 
Jacob’s search produces few leads at first. Worse yet, his comfortable group of friends breaks apart under the stress of life overseas. Alone, Jacob must confront the possibility that his birth family may be lost to him forever. But as the end of his year in Korea approaches, he receives a life-changing piece of news—one that will force him to choose which side of the ocean his future lies. 

ONE-YEAR CONTRACT is an upmarket novel complete at 81,000 words. I’m an educator who has spent the past eleven years living and working in South Korea. In my free time, I enjoy learning more about the people and places of my adopted home.

Thank you for your time and consideration. 


 10 
 on: Yesterday at 09:56:32 PM 
Started by Waterfall - Last post by Waterfall
Hi, all.

In support of the new nonfiction book coming in April, I've started a new website at herbchildress.com. The nonfiction is under the tabs for Books and Articles, the fiction is under Craft Gallery, and the tab called Slush is the opening chapter of a manuscript I've written about the joys and despairs of the fiction writer's life. Feel free to browse around, and welcome!

(It feels odd, and a little revealing, to have a link here to something under my own IRL name, after a couple of years here as Waterfall... embarrassed2)

 

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