QueryTracker Community
October 17, 2018, 09:31:42 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Note: This forum uses different usernames and passwords than those of the main QueryTracker site. 
Please register if you want to post messages.

This forum is also accessible by the public (including search engines).
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Waiting...and fretting about everything in-between  (Read 330 times)
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« on: October 11, 2018, 08:33:25 PM »

So I was looking through the main QT site's comments (yet again) for some agents and it amazes me to see that some people have gotten offers a week later or even a mere couple days. First of all, wow and second of all...I think it's amazing that they got so lucky.
My full ms has been out for two weeks and I've been having bouts of excitement, apprehension and just overall fretting about every little thing. So I just want to know if these are legit times or as we well know the times vary but still, it just seems so surreal that some of these people have gotten their offers so dang fast, especially when I see the word counts for some mss; do the agents read the whole thing too???

I know I'm probably overthinking things but my mind keeps wandering... 
Logged
koji
Sr. Member
****

Karma: 37
Offline Offline

Posts: 189


« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2018, 01:40:14 AM »

For sure, some people get offers of rep that fast. I listened to a podcast with an agent who said she assesses which queries she thinks will get other offers of rep, so she can read quickly and be the first to offer if she wants to. I think that is a common thing for agents to do- if it is a query they like, but know it is probably not going to get tons of offers of rep (for example, more controversial material, a quiet book etc. ) they put it aside for books they think will get an offer quickly.

That's not to say books that get offers of rep after a month or two are bad books- the agent liked them and offered on them- that's huge. But it's a matter of the agent knowing their market and jumping on things they think will be super successful before anyone else.

Also, books submitted through contests, like pitchwars, where a bunch of agents request at the same time tend to get looked at quickly because the agent knows exactly who else has the full.
Logged
Munley
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 87
Offline Offline

Posts: 313


Mr. Fluff -- from the SPCA


« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2018, 05:56:19 AM »

Koji's observations are things I never thought of, but I can see that they could be reasons agents prioritize a certain way. Interesting.
Logged
Tabris
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 944
Offline Offline

Posts: 4697


I rock!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 06:44:28 AM »

especially when I see the word counts for some mss; do the agents read the whole thing too???

Most problems with a manuscript are obvious by the time you've gotten through two chapters, so no -- if they're rejecting, they may only have read the first chapter, the first paragraph, whatever. Once they know it's not going to work they can close it out.

For nonfiction, they probably read over the whole proposal but not necessarily the entire manuscript of the actual book. And one of my former agents admitted to me after we were on submission for a few months that he hadn't actually read ALL of my manuscript.

For fiction, most agents do read the whole manuscript before deciding, though.

(Oh, and if you're stressing about the full and overthinking things -- send more queries. It helps when you've got multiple fulls because you can't worry about any single one of them for very long. lol )
Logged


Come visit my weblog!
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2018, 09:26:22 AM »

For sure, some people get offers of rep that fast. I listened to a podcast with an agent who said she assesses which queries she thinks will get other offers of rep, so she can read quickly and be the first to offer if she wants to. I think that is a common thing for agents to do- if it is a query they like, but know it is probably not going to get tons of offers of rep (for example, more controversial material, a quiet book etc. ) they put it aside for books they think will get an offer quickly.

That's not to say books that get offers of rep after a month or two are bad books- the agent liked them and offered on them- that's huge. But it's a matter of the agent knowing their market and jumping on things they think will be super successful before anyone else.

Also, books submitted through contests, like pitchwars, where a bunch of agents request at the same time tend to get looked at quickly because the agent knows exactly who else has the full.

Yeah, makes total sense. I can see some when they find that 'diamond in the rough' wanting to jump on it because it can end up being a lost opportunity if they don't act quick. The agent who has my full right now is an associate agent, so he's building a list but he seemed really interested and intrigued by my work from our correspondence but I don't want to get ahead of myself too much. haha   embarrassed2
Logged
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2018, 09:49:19 AM »

especially when I see the word counts for some mss; do the agents read the whole thing too???

Most problems with a manuscript are obvious by the time you've gotten through two chapters, so no -- if they're rejecting, they may only have read the first chapter, the first paragraph, whatever. Once they know it's not going to work they can close it out.

For nonfiction, they probably read over the whole proposal but not necessarily the entire manuscript of the actual book. And one of my former agents admitted to me after we were on submission for a few months that he hadn't actually read ALL of my manuscript.

For fiction, most agents do read the whole manuscript before deciding, though.

(Oh, and if you're stressing about the full and overthinking things -- send more queries. It helps when you've got multiple fulls because you can't worry about any single one of them for very long. lol )

Agreed there, I mean when I start a book I think I'll enjoy then suddenly after the first page or even the first few sentences there's just no interest and I'll set it in the 'unfinished' pile. Gosh, I would think it'd be the opposite with reading fiction/nonfiction because the latter is obviously something that needs qualifications but I can understand how some wouldn't.

I do have about...nine other queries out right now and this full request was my first (after 45 rejections in nine months  embarrassed). This agent asked me to edit the first couple chapters before sending out the whole thing which I happily did though I feel silly not having went through again before I even sent out any others just to have given myself more a chance. I'm super flattered either way that even through the mess, this agent saw something that intrigued him enough to want to read it.

Regardless, I'm really trying to keep light about the whole thing just so I don't go too stir crazy. Also, thank you guys, for taking the time to read through this rambling of mine and giving such great advice too, it really helps ease my mind!  Grin
Logged
Lobo307
Newbie
*

Karma: 3
Offline Offline

Posts: 7



« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2018, 09:31:59 AM »

I've queried four novels. The first three have combined rejections totaling around two hundred (one of these was a pitchwars novel). For years I got full requests and R&Rs, and even an offer of rep at one point. But none of that worked out. And it never felt like it would. Each time it felt like I was trying to force a square story into a round hole.

But this summer I queried my fourth novel, something very different from what I'd worked on before. I sent out a small batch of four queries to test the reaction, and I got two full requests. So I sent out two more to see if it was a fluke, and got another request. Six queries, three requests. That's when I knew something was different about this MS. Then that third request turned into an offer of rep after only two weeks of querying. Believe me, I was as shocked as anyone. When we went out on submission with publishers (again a very small first batch of editors) we got an offer within two weeks.

Take away? I wish I knew. But I think some confluence of a writer's developed craft meeting up with timing and luck go into some books getting quicker attention than others. The market wants what the market wants. All we can do is keep writing and hope we hit the mark.
Logged

Rep'd by Marlene Stringer at The Stringer Agency
eleonora
Newbie
*

Karma: 2
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2018, 10:57:03 PM »

The thing you can't ever know is the extent to which an agent, at any given moment of time, is consumed with projects outside of manuscripts. Every agent goes through their own season--they may have just made an offer, and are now prioritizing editorial comments for a new client; they may have had six clients all send in a new manuscript or synopsis or proposal, within days or weeks of each other; they may be a new agent, with a lot of free time, or an agent that just needs 6 hours of sleep and can read quickly.

I would agree generally that, when something REALLY captivates an agent's mind, they will almost definitely prioritize reading quickly--but you never really know. Be patient, and keep querying, and WRITE SOMETHING NEW. Write that other novel you've always wished you'd read.
Logged
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2018, 09:54:36 AM »

The market wants what the market wants. All we can do is keep writing and hope we hit the mark.

Yep, exactly right.
Logged
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2018, 10:03:46 AM »

The thing you can't ever know is the extent to which an agent, at any given moment of time, is consumed with projects outside of manuscripts. Every agent goes through their own season--they may have just made an offer, and are now prioritizing editorial comments for a new client; they may have had six clients all send in a new manuscript or synopsis or proposal, within days or weeks of each other; they may be a new agent, with a lot of free time, or an agent that just needs 6 hours of sleep and can read quickly.

I would agree generally that, when something REALLY captivates an agent's mind, they will almost definitely prioritize reading quickly--but you never really know. Be patient, and keep querying, and WRITE SOMETHING NEW. Write that other novel you've always wished you'd read.

Agreed, you never know. Starting a new project is definitely the best distraction, which I've thankfully started one. So if this first novel doesn't work out, there's always others to be written even if they never get to publication.
Logged
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2018, 01:40:26 PM »

Just wanted to give a quick update: My full was rejected this morning. It was very kind and I agree with what he had to say, I just need to fix minor things but I won't lie and say that I'm not sad but hey.

Onward to the next one.
Logged
TigerAsh
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 33
Offline Offline

Posts: 244



« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2018, 04:54:59 PM »

Just wanted to give a quick update: My full was rejected this morning. It was very kind and I agree with what he had to say, I just need to fix minor things but I won't lie and say that I'm not sad but hey.

Onward to the next one.

Sorry to hear that. Hopefully you'll have better luck with future requests!  Hug
Logged
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2018, 05:32:13 PM »

Just wanted to give a quick update: My full was rejected this morning. It was very kind and I agree with what he had to say, I just need to fix minor things but I won't lie and say that I'm not sad but hey.

Onward to the next one.

Sorry to hear that. Hopefully you'll have better luck with future requests!  Hug

Thank you so much TigerAsh, I hope so too! It was a big blow at first but now I think it's time to set this project aside and work on the new one.  Smiley
Logged
TigerAsh
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 33
Offline Offline

Posts: 244



« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2018, 05:50:40 PM »

Just wanted to give a quick update: My full was rejected this morning. It was very kind and I agree with what he had to say, I just need to fix minor things but I won't lie and say that I'm not sad but hey.

Onward to the next one.

Sorry to hear that. Hopefully you'll have better luck with future requests!  Hug

Thank you so much TigerAsh, I hope so too! It was a big blow at first but now I think it's time to set this project aside and work on the new one.  Smiley


You're welcome.  Smiley

And I hope you're not setting it aside just because of this one full rejection. Many authors get rejections (plural) on their full manuscript before they are offered representation.

Logged
jessikalindst
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


This is my cat Ronaldo


« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2018, 06:50:07 PM »

Just wanted to give a quick update: My full was rejected this morning. It was very kind and I agree with what he had to say, I just need to fix minor things but I won't lie and say that I'm not sad but hey.

Onward to the next one.

Sorry to hear that. Hopefully you'll have better luck with future requests!  Hug

Thank you so much TigerAsh, I hope so too! It was a big blow at first but now I think it's time to set this project aside and work on the new one.  Smiley


You're welcome.  Smiley

And I hope you're not setting it aside just because of this one full rejection. Many authors get rejections (plural) on their full manuscript before they are offered representation.



This morning I definitely had that mindset because I have a tendency to be really hard on myself about these sort of things (I have a perfectionism problem). But yeah, you're right I mean just because of one full rejection doesn't mean I should give up entirely. I guess it more hit me hard because I've queried so many agents these past months and the more I look for others to send to, after the rejections come in, that sound good, they're either closed to unsolicited work or closed in general so I felt that I hit a dead end.
Now I feel that I should take a break, give myself a couple days to recover and start on revising again (in my current state I don't think the revisions would be very good ones or maybe they would but right now my mind is unfocused) then get back into the races.

Thank you for all your help and encouragement, it truly means a lot to me and gives me more hope. Grin
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!