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Queries and Agents => Literary Agents => Topic started by: Pandean on June 10, 2015, 04:46:44 PM

Title: Typos
Post by: Pandean on June 10, 2015, 04:46:44 PM
So I was re-reading BOTR for fun and I realized I'd come across a few typos/grammar errors. Not like, a gigantic amount but, you know, they were there.

And it had me wondering how much would it take for them to turn off an agent?
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: Tabris on June 10, 2015, 04:54:58 PM
Depends on the kind of typo.

Inverted letters? Not a big deal.

"Dear A Gent: Please except my manuscript" is a slightly bigger deal.  :up:  They can fix an instance of clumsy fingers but they won't want to fix repeated grammar, syntax and usage errors.
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: Pandean on June 10, 2015, 05:24:13 PM
Depends on the kind of typo.

Inverted letters? Not a big deal.

"Dear A Gent: Please except my manuscript" is a slightly bigger deal.  :up:  They can fix an instance of clumsy fingers but they won't want to fix repeated grammar, syntax and usage errors.

Not the second one.

Like, saying Your instead of You and adding a comma in the wrong place.

I have a slight issue with commas. No matter how much I edit there are always misplaced commas.

It's not like it's littered everywhere, though.
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: gckatz on June 10, 2015, 05:32:37 PM
Chillax. Nobody expects a manuscript to be 100% free of errors. That's why we have editors.
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: Pandean on June 10, 2015, 05:39:09 PM
Chillax. Nobody expects a manuscript to be 100% free of errors. That's why we have editors.

Thanks, gckatz. :)
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: Aubrey on June 10, 2015, 07:48:26 PM
Yeah, I wouldn't give it a second thought. I just reviewed my MS that's on submission, and I caught a couple that got by my agent and me. OOPS.
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: TerryRodgers on June 10, 2015, 09:29:58 PM
Chillax. Nobody expects a manuscript to be 100% free of errors. That's why we have editors.

I actually believe this may be changing because of the fierce competition that exists today. As many times as I edit my manuscripts (I probably go through 20-25 revisions) plus the dozens of people that read and let me know things they see, I have still had full requests that the agent mentioned I needed to work harder at editing. I also know probably a dozen or more authors that hadn't had much luck in landing an agent. Then they hired an editor and found an agent and ended up selling their novels.

I'm not saying it's necessary or the norm, but I'm wondering if things have changed with the explosion of self-publishing. I've been speaking with a former acquisition editor with S&S that decided to go freelance, and she kind of eluded to the fact that many publishing houses are not acquiring novels if there appears to be too much editing needed compared to ten years ago.

Just makes me wonder how much an agent or editor does today compared to what they did 10 plus years ago.
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: Pandean on June 10, 2015, 09:38:11 PM
Chillax. Nobody expects a manuscript to be 100% free of errors. That's why we have editors.

I actually believe this may be changing because of the fierce competition that exists today. As many times as I edit my manuscripts (I probably go through 20-25 revisions) plus the dozens of people that read and let me know things they see, I have still had full requests that the agent mentioned I needed to work harder at editing. I also know probably a dozen or more authors that hadn't had much luck in landing an agent. Then they hired an editor and found an agent and ended up selling their novels.

I'm not saying it's necessary or the norm, but I'm wondering if things have change with the explosion of self-publishing. I've been speaking with an former acquisition editor with S&S that decided to go freelance, and she kind of eluded to the fact that many publishing houses are not acquiring novels if there appears to be too much editing needed compared to ten years ago.

Just makes me wonder how much an agent or editor does today compared to what they did 10 plus years ago.

Well, I think there's a difference between line and developmental edits.
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: Sarah Ahiers (Falen) on June 11, 2015, 08:17:24 AM
One of my teachers just told me that i don't know what I'm doing with my commas. And apparently i didn't know this. But that didn't stop me from landing the agent or the book deal so i'm guessing they won't care.

And a few typos here and there won't break anything.
Title: Re: Typos
Post by: MookyMcD on June 11, 2015, 08:39:41 AM
It's rare I read a published book without finding an error. My guess is I find an average of around five -- NOT counting commas. While there are clear rules that apply to comma usage 80% of the time, the remaining 20% is gray as hell. If people actually set off each technically independent clause with commas, there'd by a TON more commas in writing, so even within the black and white rule, the exception is rampant.

I think they're looking for very, very good, and clear evidence you've scrubbed the crap out of it, but nobody expects perfection.