Author Topic: Blogging/Serializing a Novel  (Read 9259 times)

Offline Pandean

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Re: Blogging/Serializing a Novel
« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2016, 06:23:21 PM »
I've read opposing views on the "Wattpad does/does not constitute publishing" issue, so thanks for sharing what you heard directly from the horse's mouth, X. :) To be safe, though, I'm not going to put my first book out there. I'm not as attached to the one I'm currently working on, so whatever happens I'm prepared to accept it.

Well I asked around again just to make sure but it seems like most agents are okay with it. It's different for short stories and such though.
WHITE STAG, an internet phenomenon, has been acquired by St. Martin's Press/Wednesday Books for publication in Winter 2019

Offline Tabris

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Re: Blogging/Serializing a Novel
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2016, 06:40:19 PM »
My novel Annihilation was originally serialized through a magazine called Mindflights. Every week they'd put up a new chapter, and at the same time the whole book was for sale "for the impatient." It did sell okay for a small press, and I know there were people reading it every week. I think the key if you're going to do it is consistency and to have a decent platform (Wattpad, for example. X just did her novel that way), but also keep in mind that once you've done that, it's *published.* You're not selling that one again.

Multiple agents say that Posting a novel on Wattpad prior to querying is not publishing it.

Agreed. Wattpad is not the same as doing it on one's blog.

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Re: Blogging/Serializing a Novel
« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2016, 06:57:27 PM »
I've read opposing views on the "Wattpad does/does not constitute publishing" issue...

Agents and publishers don't have an issue with posting a draft on Wattpad. In fact you just have to look at the number of success stories it is generating. Wattpad is a huge social media site for teenagers, some big number deals are being brokered for popular Wattpad novels. I don't understand how authors (particularly YA authors) can ignore it. Readers love engaging with their favourite authors on Wattpad.

Offline Pandean

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Re: Blogging/Serializing a Novel
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2016, 07:13:31 PM »
I have a fan base there. It's small but there are people who will see me on the forums and be like

WAIT? Are you THAT Pandean? The one who wrote White Stag???!!!

It's one of the best feelings ever.

(My screen name there is Pandean)
WHITE STAG, an internet phenomenon, has been acquired by St. Martin's Press/Wednesday Books for publication in Winter 2019

Offline Nostrabuttus

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Re: Blogging/Serializing a Novel
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2016, 09:14:12 AM »
The first blog I started was posting short stories based on the struggles of an incompetent romance writer. I created a small community along with a few neighbors, who he interacted with along his journey.

I eventually abandoned the blog because I only had a few followers. I went back two years later and checked the statistics to see if anyone had visited the blog. Thousands of people from ten different countries had viewed the posts on that blog, and they were still coming. The month I checked had over 700 views.

I took the twenty-two short stories I had posted on that blog and published them in an eBook. The eBook has not done well, but I'm still averaging two to three hundred viewers per month on the blog. Go figure. I started advertising my eBooks on the blog, which caused somewhat of a drop off of viewers for a while.

What the viewers really wanted were the short stories, not posts that were book promotions. What I originally created was a person struggling to get published. His humorous mishaps apparently were interesting to viewers. Had I stayed the course and kept posting more short stories, I think the audience would have continued to grow.

Here is what I learned.

1. Keep trying new stuff, until you find something that works.

2. Nothing keeps working forever so change is constant in this industry.

3. Everything is somewhat of a gamble, but if you are unwilling to play, you have zero chance of winning any of the jackpots, small or large.

Here is my advice: If you are excited about something, give it a try and see what happens.






« Last Edit: February 22, 2016, 09:16:30 AM by Nostrabuttus »
Author of humorous short stories, mainstream suspense, mystery, and thriller novels.

https://jmdavisauthor.wordpress.com/
Twitter: @jmdavisauthor
http://jacklabloom.blogspot.com/