QueryTracker Community
March 25, 2017, 12:29:51 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Note: This forum uses different usernames and passwords than those of the main QueryTracker site. 
Please register if you want to post messages.

This forum is also accessible by the public (including search engines).
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: POV  (Read 836 times)
BarryW54
Full Member
***

Karma: 4
Offline Offline

Posts: 69


POV
« on: January 05, 2017, 05:09:18 PM »

The story I am writing has two characters for now. A peasant farmer and a fox that was sent to bring him back to a father, who is a king, and two brothers he never knew. How do I keep the POV from switching? Marc Rolfs is the MC but the fox must also fill in the blanks. Help!!
Logged
jcwrites
Sr. Member
****

Karma: 21
Offline Offline

Posts: 111


« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2017, 05:24:25 PM »

How do I keep the POV from switching?

There is no rule against changing the narrative POV, but there are some caveats when doing so.

The modern convention is to stay with one character's POV during a chapter or scene. (Scene breaks are indicated by inserting a blank line. That is to say,  if you're double-spacing your manuscript, insert an extra double-space.) Be aware that including too many POV characters can be harmful to a reader's attention span; also, switching too often between POVs (called "head hopping") might cause reader melt-down. So, you'd be safe to let Rolfs and the fox narrate as you see fit.

(You can, of course, employ the omniscient POV, in which the narrator--unseen and above it all--narrates for Rolfs and the fox at will. Caution, though, for this POV style is considered by some to be outdated.)

Logged
BarryW54
Full Member
***

Karma: 4
Offline Offline

Posts: 69


« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2017, 05:27:40 PM »

Ok, thanks. Er, I misspelled my MC's name. It's Rolfe.  Grin
Logged
Munley
Guest
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2017, 05:58:13 PM »

Are you writing a short story or a novel?

In either case, you don't necessarily have to stick to one point of view, but you might choose to limit the pov to one character. Usually short stories work best in only one POV, but that's not a hard rule.

The the thing to be avoided is switching carelessly or randomly switching to the viewpoint of whoever happens to be standing around when there's no good reason for the reader to suddenly learn what that character is thinking, or switching in cases where a particular character's thoughts are not important to the story.

Probably the best way to learn how POV is done well is to read other fiction and notice what's going on.
When there is an unwarranted change in POV, it's jarring and you'll notice.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2017, 06:01:18 PM by Munley » Logged
BarryW54
Full Member
***

Karma: 4
Offline Offline

Posts: 69


« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2017, 06:13:11 PM »

Well, it started out as a contest but quickly turned into a Medieval story. My outline is leaning toward a novel, though. 

Thanks!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!