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Author Topic: Question on Transitioning  (Read 472 times)
mshao24
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« on: July 09, 2018, 03:25:30 PM »

I'd like some feedback on this. When I first started writing, I didn't know how this industry worked. I vanity published my first and second books, but my contract clearly states that I have absolute control over what I want to do with my book. If I want to sever the contract, I own all the rights and whatnot.

Is it possible to speak with agents about something like this? Now that I've learned a bit more about publishing, I think I'd like to shift into the traditional route, because I really haven't gotten much support from my publisher.

Anyone have experience with something like this?
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jcwrites
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2018, 06:03:00 PM »

There's no fixed rule on this, but generally speaking it's an uphill battle with chances of success somewhere between slim and none. (I know, THE MARTIAN, and all that.) Right off the bat, an agent will want to know how many copies you sold. That's verifiable sales, excluding freebies and other giveaways. Here's the hard part: those sales will have to be somewhere in the five- to ten-thousand range—copies, not dollars.  (I saw that number mentioned on Janet Reid's blog and heard it mentioned elsewhere.) The thing to understand is, an agent will have to gauge the interest you generated on the first release, and then gauge how much unfilled demand is still out there. In other words, did you drain the swamp? As I said, it's a tough sell.

My advice would be, write another novel. Knock it out of the park. Then you can point to your self-pubbed work and say, "Now, about these...."
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mshao24
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2018, 10:49:50 AM »

That's very good advice. Marketing has been my greatest challenge. I haven't figured out a good way to get my series the exposure I'd like. I'm thinking when the second one comes out this month that I'll send copies to radio show hosts, etc. to try and expand out of my local market. Its been difficult with juggling my full time job and writing and whatnot. But I suppose I need to divert more of my focus onto marketing if I expect it to succeed. I still feel new to the industry, so I'm learning as much as I can as I go. I appreciate the feedback!
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