Author Topic: Anyone here a humor novelist first?  (Read 926 times)

Offline gellisbarber

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Anyone here a humor novelist first?
« on: September 23, 2020, 02:32:45 PM »
I'm looking for some humorist friends. Do you write funny fiction? Especially, funny fiction that doesn't fit neatly into another category or where the humor makes your book somewhat of an offbeat fit for most commercial genres? Do you love a clever phrase, high-brow humor, or a pithy nonsequitur? Please be my friend.

I'd love to find people with whom to discuss the challenges of writing and querying humor fiction.

Offline lucidities

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Re: Anyone here a humor novelist first?
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2022, 12:22:52 PM »
Hello, gellisbarber:

I'm new to QT and the forum, and thus I'm unsure whether to reply to your seemingly inactive post or to start a new thread.

Starting a new thread/topic seems to me likely to end up, in the aggregate, cluttering the categories list, and I'm not sure yet how searches span multiple topic statements.

So, for today, this reply to what a red warning message says is a "topic that has not been posted in for at least 120 days."

I'm interested in talking about humorous fiction that presumes to be literary!

Be well--

Offline Tallis

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Re: Anyone here a humor novelist first?
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2022, 03:52:48 PM »

Me too!  (Thanks, Lucidities, for exhuming this old post.)

Offline lucidities

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Re: Anyone here a humor novelist first?
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2022, 12:46:51 PM »
As to gellisbarber's multiple-choice "clever phrase, highbrow humor, or a pithy nonsequitur," I love all three, and readily indulge in the first two in my novel.

  • "Lucidities" is the name by which my protagonist is known as he recounts, in present tense and on parallel tracks, both history and his own troubles; the reader is invited to cross "Thucydides" with "lucid."
  • When Lucidities is tempted into an affair with an archivist, their liaison is handled comically in a chapter titled "False Tryst" . . . for the benefit of lovers of Sibelius.

And so on, all in the spirit of The Simpsons one might say, where viewers of quite divergent cultural awarenesses can enjoy the show simultaneously. I was introduced to the series when it was new by a thirteen-year-old kid, and we sat side by side laughing our heads off--at quite disparate stuff. (Can't speak for the kid, but I loved seeing that the greedy Mister Burns lives on the corner of Mammon and Croesus.)

My novel uses dialogue profusely, and more often than not it's meant to be broadly comic. I'd say that overall, "humorous" is an apt descriptor for the entire book, even when the going gets rough.

And you, and yours?